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20120925
20121003
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close to what you might call a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encaps late it? >> guest: he it a smart and successful person. he's been talking about foreign policy. it's not the issue he wants to emphasis in the campaign. he wants the campaign to be obviously about the economy and about our unemployment rate. and it's an unusual position for republican to be in to be running against democrat who has a strong record on national security. i think that's been difficult for the romney campaign, you know, i have worked for both republicans and democrats in various administrations, so i'm not a political person. but if seems to me that republicans always try to run to the right of a democrat and sometimes accuse democrats of being weak on national security. on this election you have president obama who have taken us out of iraq. president obama who has waged a tough war against al qaeda and has gone off the leadership note tbli osama bin laden who has taken out from the terrorist on yemen -- and president obama because of the actions in the very pressive record has boosted am
running the foreign policy establishment if you elected mitt romney -- these folks led us into the most disastrous foreign policy decision in a generation which was the invasion of iraq. it empowered iran, it created a trillion dollars of debt charged on the national credit card, it killed more than 4,000 americans, it wounded more than 30,000, it left hundreds of thousands of iraqis dead or displaced. and yet these folks want us to hand the keys of foreign policy back to them? it's, it's -- i mean, the nerve of the individuals who drug us into the worst foreign policy disaster in the middle east in a generation, to say that they somehow understand this region better is, it's laughable, frkly. >> well, you mentioned syria. how -- there's a lot of pressure for the administration to get more involved in syria. how do you think the administration is responding, how should it respond? >> well, on this issue it's interesting. you know, if you actually peel away a lot of governor romney's positions on a lot of issues, there's not a lot of difference between him and president obama. in fact, s
against him. the military, i believe, officers 90% voting against president obama, voting for mitt romney. they know what's happening in the military. massive cuts happening. because of the president's policies, not because of the congress. they shouldn't have agreed to the sequestering, but the president is not fixing it. he already had the gates cuts in the hundreds of billions of dollars, destroying the pentagon, withdrawing from iraq, running away from afghanistan on a date certain withdraw time lime that's encouraging the taliban. i didn't talk much about foreign affairs and threatening the benefit packages which is why the veterans signed up for and deserve it. i think they'll vote against him. finally, the jewish vote, i trust medved, trust them both, and they told me in the entire adult life they never saw the jewish-american vote so leans towards voting for republican in such strong numbers. there's one word "israel" written all over it. president obama is hose still to israel. left benjamin netanyahu in the basement, say call me if something changes, did not treat him like the b
romney says there is a model he's promised a veto. the gerry before the radical policy prescription called deportation, the idea of making life so miserable here that immigrants are literally purged from the country so it's hurt badly but hispanics. the strategy, that strategy means as you point out in your excellent paper, really the southwest is out of reach in large part because of this. they've pulled off the mexico. they have a shot in colorado and nevada but if the turnout is high not much. so thankfully the hispanic strategy that the romney strategy has been let's talk about the economy. the cuban americans and puerto ricans and in hopes we can peel off just enough of them because maybe that will be the trick. the problem is in florida of the hispanic electorate has changed quite significantly. the fastest-growing group are dimond puerto rican latin american immigrants for whom immigration is a defining issue in a litmus test issue. roughly a third now. so i suspect he's going to have a hard time winning florida in part because of the changing demographics of the latino elect
that romney takes a different view on how deal with russia and you see a different policy toward russia. on iran it's a hard call. one thing we haven't spoken about. maybe you were going get to it. >> we are twenty five minutes in to this. okay since i consider to be a not unreasonable possibility regardless who was in the white house that the united states might wind up whether it was a desire or has no choice in engaging in military action in iran. what is it going to do to the consensuses about spending or the american people interested in foreign policy and even issues like the defense budget? and that's why issues like that and the onces we don't know about that make me wary of all these straight line projections we're make in the future based on what things look like right now. >> anyone want to address the point? >> which point? >> the point about . >> pick on any of the points. i meant the point about iran and the likely hood we would enter in to military action there regardless of who wins. [inaudible] >> question from the audience? >> yes, sir. front row. >> microphone approac
debate is october 22 from lynn university in florida, and the questions turn to foreign policy. live on c-span, c-span radio, and also online at c-span.org. up next, a discussion on the health care law presidential candidate mitt romney signed into law in 2006 when he was governor of massachusetts from this morning's "washington journal." >> host: a reporter of the "boston herald" talking about the health care bill mitt romney signed in 2006. thank you for joining us. >> guest: good morning. >> host: give us the basics, first of all, back in time to the debate happening in massachusetts. what was governor romney's role in getting the health care law pushed and signed? was he the one who initiated the process? >> guest: it was a massive bipartisan effort, involved politicians, business leaders, small business owners, but he was the governor at the time, and he was the one who effectively signed it into law, and as a backdrop, which probably everybody here knows pretty well, we, as a nation, are dealing with ever increasing health care costs, and as the health care costs go up, we're also d
with romney should be read as not just a gaffe, but to some extent been delightfully honest in a sense about where today's gop is coming from in terms of their attitude towards economic and public policy. and i think that's within a millstone around the neck and, this would not win an election in the beginning for them either. but let's just say they haven't maximized their opportunity. so that's my take on what's going on but i hope you guys are going to check out the report, look at some of those cool maps and charts in it, absorb all the data to go be a short quiz later. but before that i want to bring up this great panel that will discuss all these issues and much more indeed excruciating detail. so why don't you all come up here and we will get started. you guys sit where you want. >> let me very briefly introduce the panel. to my left is anna greenberg, senior vice president of greenberg quinlan rosner research, one of my favorite pollsters did not only does she go out and take the pulse of the nation but she always has intelligent and interesting things to say about it. to my right is
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7